Our Infomural finds a home at the London Transport Museum

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

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Back in July, our Think & Visualise team had the pleasure of working with Arup and TFL to bring the future of transport to life during the Transported By Design Festival on Regent’s Street. Today, you can find our Infomural in it’s new home in the front entrance of the London Transport Museum.

The full-colour Infomural can be found just right of the front doors of the museum. Created live over the course of the one-day event, it captures the cumulative vision of thousands of participants. During the festival, attendees where asked “What will transport in London look like in 2040?”. Participants shared visions of a greener, more connected and sustainable world – with the occasional hover car thrown in for good measure. These ideas are elaborated upon in the text surrounding the infomural within the museum.

The festival was a wonderful opportunity for us to work with the public as a whole.  We can’t be happier to be included in the London Transport Museum!

Innovation Arts Infomural for TFL

Photo: Innovation Arts Infomural at the London Transport Museum.

Reality versus Possibility

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

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In the last post, we talked about how language can both shape as well as describe our reality. This is vital when an organisation wants to create real and sustained change – visualising new possibilities, choosing one and moving hundreds or thousands of employees towards it successfully– so let’s explore the idea of reality a little further. Where do our embedded ideas come from?

Reality

We tend to create the framework for our own reality based on past observations, experiences and reflections. We do this using a language that has helped us understand this state, enriched with further meaning and credibility through dialogue, shared experiences, and discussions with others.

The limitations of this process are clear. If we remain in equilibrium, constrained by our own perception of reality, then where do breakthroughs come from? What must happen to break our own alignment with conventional wisdom and follow another train of thought, and then allow others to understand it and (potentially) embrace it? It is at this point some might begin talking about ‘creativity’ and ‘brainstorming’, but many attempts at creativity in problem solving or in innovation remain framed – and as such constrained – by existing ideas of reality. Before we look at creativity our next post, we first have to deal with the idea of paradigm shifts.

Breakthrough thinking requires challenging our acquired knowledge. Without getting too deep into theory, for now we will say that to experience a breakthrough, we must be open to questioning what we think we know and the way we view the world. We must also accept our personal or organisational ‘fog of war’ – the things we are as yet unaware that we don’t know – and that whatever is in there could potentially be exciting. Engaging with our ignorance as something positive allows us to unlock our curiosity, so that we may actively seek out novelty, experience and new interpretations, which gives us the power to embrace a new paradigm of ‘possibility’.

Possibility

Possibility are the things that may or may not come to pass. In any one given situation there could be many different outcomes, but we limit our choices as human beings and as communities, often because we work on options grounded in our past and by a communal agreement on what is, and what is not possible.

Challenging a communal agreement opens up the challenger to risk, whether purely reputational or much worse than that… Consider, for example, that at a time when conventional wisdom assumed Earth to be the centre of the universe, Galileo Galilei reported his discovery that the centre of the universe was, in fact, the sun. In doing so he was stepping out of a community of agreement to introduce a new possibility – opening a dialogue that challenged ‘reality’. Unfortunately, Galileo’s new ‘reality’ fundamentally disputed established teaching, and his refusal to recant his theory meant he was imprisoned by the Inquisition for the rest of his life.

Many other eminent scientists have gone on to make discoveries that became accepted as natural truths, but were subsequently disproven. Isaac Newton’s theory that light was composed of particles, for example, was accepted as fact until 100 years later when Thomas Young discovered that light spread as waves and opinion changed. Subsequently, Einstein came along with his famous e=mc2 equation and told us that light travels in waves as particles. We do not ridicule Newton or Young for being ‘wrong’ of course; each scientist made his own contribution to our evolving understanding of physics, a discipline where the most renowned thinkers are constantly open to extraordinary and as yet unimagined possibilities. Other disciplines would do well to learn from this approach.

From reality to possibility

Practically speaking, how do you shift an organisation’s paradigm from one of reality to one of possibility? We firmly believe this is not the job of a single leader. Rather, leaders must harness the combined strength, intellect and imagination of their people. By bringing many voices together in conversation and collaboration, the realm of possibility is greatly expanded and the ground is laid for exploration, experimentation, inquiry, trial and error and ultimately, triumph.

Once you have assembled the right people – people who know, people who decide and people who do – and you know the questions you want to answer, the next step is to carefully design the conditions for having necessary conversations. There are many different kinds of conversations, each of which serves a different purpose. The conversations that can be had between two people are different to those had within a small group of eight, and different again to those of a larger group, different yet again to those held in person and, indeed, virtually. It is likely that a mix of all of these, carefully structured and using appropriate language, will move you from ‘reality’ to ‘possibility’. Design thinking helps establish which conversations must be had, with whom and how, in order to achieve the possible and to unlock the Group Genius that leads to breakthrough ideas.

Possibility, and knowing that there are in fact multiple options, also suggests the necessity of making choices. It is sometimes harder than we think to accept we have choices to make, as this also imposes the requirement of taking responsibility. The next question becomes, ‘how do we make the best decision?’ and the answer is creativity.

Once you have entered a paradigm of possibility, creativity is no longer the process of generating ideas, but the process of eliminating options.

Language, Models and Reality

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

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In the beginning was the word…” The first line of the Gospel of John is a phrase many readers will be familiar with, and one that uses the metaphor of ‘the word’ to represent God—an idea philosophers, scientists, theologians and thinkers continue to debate. What happens next is that all things come to be, life, and light shining through darkness. But first, of all things, was the word. Why choose ‘the word’ as a metaphor? Could it be because words and language are the most vital model we have for understanding and reshaping our reality? Or is there more to it than that?

 

In an earlier post, I talked about words and language as a model – an imperfect representation of something else that is in some way useful. Language is the basis of our own individual, internal reasoning or ‘way of thinking’ because it enables us to describe the world around and within us. We create definitions that convey the form, breadth and identity of everything. We compare and contrast, form relationships and make associations to help better understand our world and form our internal frames of reference.

 

Language also forms the basis of our interactions with our environment and the people within it. We use it to communicate complex social structures and our place within them, to understand and to be understood, to resolve disputes, and to provoke action. Language as a model is so powerful that words alone can move human beings to feel fear, anger or disgust; it can be the catalyst for positive change or can start wars. Through storytelling we share our experiences of the world as we see it, as well as our vision of what might be possible. Language can not only describe but also shape our reality, manipulating other peoples’ idea of the truth. But in order to do that effectively and with intent, we need to be confident that the way we interpret language is consistent with those whom we seek to influence.

 

Pattern Language

Gordon Pask, eminent Cyberneticist, did a tremendous amount of work on conversations and ‘Conversation Theory.’ One important conclusion, paraphrased, is that in order to understand we must agree. For example, if we can agree the meaning and context of the word ‘green,’ I will understand what you mean when you say ‘green’. That both of us use a word ‘green’ is not enough – many cultures would include colours I see as ‘blue’ with their definition of green – we must agree on the precise meanings of words in order to fully understand. Although this sounds like a simple concept, our experience of language in a variety of organisations tells us it is not always one meaning that is assured, leading to conflicts, costs and wasted time and effort.

 

If we are not to assume linguistic agreement – and we should not – we must establish it through conversation. Through ongoing conversations in our social groupings over time we form our own unique languages to facilitate our lives together, building a sense of community, culture and identity for ourselves.

 

Christopher Alexander, a master of the architectural world, describes the notion of a ‘Pattern Language’: In a town with a living language, the pattern language is so widely shared that everyone can use it. When the language is shared, the individual patterns in the language are profound. We have, of course, our own pattern language at InnovationArts – you will be getting a sense of some of it through these blog posts – and find different pattern languages in every organisation with whom we work. Chances are you can identify a pattern language in your own organisation and see clearly how it is distinct from other organisations you’ve encountered, as well as how it differs from the pattern language of your own family and social circle.

 

Patterns in language are always simple – complex patterns cannot survive the slow transmission from person to person. They are also comprehensive, covering the whole of life as we know it. In this way, we are able to reflect and interact around form, scope, identity and our relationship to our environment – let’s call it ‘context’ – and take a stance as to where we fit. As a group of individuals we use language to model our ‘reality’.

 

Language and Reality

Let’s come back to models. When we talk about reality, we are talking about the things we know to be true. Language, dialogue and conversation give us the potential to build and share our knowledge. But how much of our ‘knowledge’ really is the truth and how much, at best, is just a model that is good enough for now?

 

We exist in a constant cycle of observation, reflection and interpretation, and as we change our perspectives our language adapts. The words we use are fundamental in articulating our view of reality and in turn become a living, evolving component of the complex systems in which we operate. The opposite can also be true: when you want to change ‘reality’ and have a new beginning, what better place to start than with ‘the word’? By intentionally shaping our pattern language we can use it to achieve our ambitions – personal, organisational and societal.

 

By thinking about language as supporting not ‘reality’ but ‘possibility’, it will help you understand why at Innovation Arts we aim to be scrupulous in the way we use language in all our work, and the powerful role words play in influencing the possible.

 

Capturing Shell’s Making The Future Accelerator

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Last week we attended Shell’s Make The Future Festival at the Olympic Park here in London. The festival brought more than 30,000 people together to share ideas and innovation for the future of global energy.

The Shell Accelerator was a one-day event during the festival that accelerated thinking and team-building through collaborative workshops interspersed with engaging talks and pitches from keynote speaker. We sent James and Jordana over to capture the content from the Shell Accelerator through graphic recording.

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If you want to read more about the event or see some of the amazing exhibitions that featured click over to their website here:

http://www.shell.co.uk/energy-and-innovation/make-the-future/london.html

TBDFest – we join Arup & TFL on Regent Street!

Sunday, July 3rd, 2016

How do you suppose a four-year-old might envision transportation for London in 2040? If you suspected flying cars, bubble buses and bunny scooters you are remarkably right. We asked four-year-olds, 90-year-olds and everyone in between that very question at Transported By Design – a TFL festival that took over Regent Street this past Sunday.

The festival was part of an ongoing initiative to educate and involve the public in the design of TFL services. It presented TFL designs from the past and present and imagined how these designs might be reinvented for the future. Partnering with ARUP, we brought public projections of the future to life with graphic recording.

We asked the public carefully crafted questions about how transport might look in 2040 and as the answers came in, we got to work! Scribes Jordana and James captured the individual ideas in two tessellated grids, while Eddie distilled the information into one incredible Infomural.

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It was an amazing day – working collaboratively with thousands of people is a rare opportunity and we relished it!

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Photo: Check us out with the Arup team!

Plus, we woke up this morning to this surprise! Take a look at Eddie on the BBC today:

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If you want to read the full BBC write-up of TBD festival you can find it online at:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-36698617

We join Innovate Finance at London Tech Week!

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

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We just got back from scribing for Innovate Finance’s “Money Talks: VCs Take The Stage”. Reversing the usual order of things, the event had VCs making pitches to start ups rather than the other way around.

The reversal is indicative of the changing investment climate for Fintech, the fastest growing industry in the UK. Many start-ups are sceptical of Venture Capitalists and investors backed by large institutions. The nature of their business allows start-ups to get prototypes off the ground without huge investment backing. However, as the industry grows, working with a larger institution can offer its own rewards. Insight, managerial support and infrastructure are as useful to start-ups as money and VC’s are willing to offer expertise as well as capital.

As a highlight of London Tech Week, the talks made clear that banks and VCs are taking greater notice of Fintech. It’s a booming market with increased investment, at the forefront of innovation. As one of the UK’s strongest business prospects, we are sure to see Fintech start-ups grow quickly from their humble roots. We sent Jordana to scribe the output of the day through graphic recording.

If you want to learn more about London Tech Week and Innovate Finance’s talks for the week look no further: http://londontechnologyweek.co.uk/event/money-talks-vcs-take-stage/

We get hip with the kids at TedxTeen in London…

Saturday, January 16th, 2016

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TEDxTeen took place in London this year at the O2. The theme was “untapped” and covered the subject of firsts – initial ideas, original innovations, first-time collaborations, and more. The event gathering together brilliant young minds for two sessions of talks that were moving as well as informative.

1MakundaAngulo-300dpiOur scribes captured content throughout the day touching upon everything from street dancing to asylum seeking in the UK. They had the pleasure of speaking to some inspiring young people during the event breaks as well. If the passionate, informed attendees of this event are our future, we’re in good hands.

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Find out more about the day’s talks at:

http://tedxteen.com

TED Global 2016 – this time Geneva!

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

This year’s TED Global took place in Geneva Switzerland. As we flew in over the snowy Alps we were filled with excitement. Headed to an equally impressive summit (excuse the puns) we were about to hear talks from incredible thinkers, creatives, and innovators from around the world. This year boasted huge names – notably Yanis Varoufakis – and we couldn’t wait to capture the rich content that lay in store for us.

The annual Global summit is divided into two sessions with musical interludes in each. This year, we captured content on macroeconomics, virtual reality, regenerating brain tissue, world travelling and so much more. Attendees were really pleased with the final Infomural and all the snapping of photos meant we could also take a peak at the other amazing exhibitors – who can resist a chance to try a VR headset!

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As part of our participation with TED we created a comic capturing the content from a few of the talks. Click the image below to have a read:

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What a brilliant way to close a year!

If you want to see more from TED Global 2015 check out their full write up at:

Decisive ideas, scientific breakthroughs, critical junctures: A recap of TEDGlobal>Geneva

Inspiring the Work Environment by Design

Monday, December 14th, 2015

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We have begun to touch on the components of a work environment that enable creativity to flourish and productivity to increase. Each of these components can make a difference, but when brought together with the right skill and intention, the effect is extraordinary. The environment is a holistic element of a complex, adaptive system. Jan Smuts, who coined the term “holism” in 1926, defined it as the “tendency in nature to form wholes that are greater than the sum of the parts”. What nature does without our intervention, we must do in man-made environments by design.

Yet looking at the actual designs around us today, we still see determined and rigid solutions in which spatial composition has been the main objective. There are many speculative real estate developments, for example, which do not consider any particular client’s needs and aim primarily at a maximum amount of anonymous rental office space. The same thinking often continues inside the company, where ignorance or a wish to save money results in anonymous rooms divided into identical workplaces.

The most common approach to office space still reckons with one workspace per person whilst imposing negotiation and meeting rooms are considered separately. Many of these individual and group spaces are regularly unoccupied. Meanwhile, the budget for furnishing the office is divided between personal workplaces and a representative zone, altogether forgetting the background zone. Yet, it is common knowledge that the coffee machine is the best communication tool and that the most productive moments at conferences are coffee breaks. Why is this forgotten while filling the office plan with desks and chairs?

And let’s think again about who uses modern office space: It is easy to agree that working practices have changed. Today’s office work no longer consists of only data entry and processing; the linear work arrangement has become parallel and serial, meaning we should be able us to use the worker, time, and space much more intensively. In addition, work is more creative, and most of the creative work is done in changing workgroups that require a flexible use of time and space: there is no more need for physically emphasised hierarchy. And of course everyone can see what mobile phones and laptops have done to our working time and workplace. So how do we see through these changes to the new requirements? What is the new model?

In HIVE, each individual performs a fixed task in the production chain – usually from nine to five. The work does not require interaction or autonomy; the space is divided into an endless number of identical working places. Thanks to automation this past typology is disappearing or changing into DEN-type, more intelligence-requiring activity, where teamwork is of primary importance. The space planning in a den-type office is mostly open, but there is still not much personal independence. The CELL-type is used mostly for work requiring concentrated thinking (lawyers, research centres) where workers have great autonomy in using their time and in the content of their work, but few possibilities for interaction.
It is believed that as information technology develops, the independent concentration type of work and project-based teamwork will be combined in most enterprises. In the new “transactional” office, both interaction and independence will be maximised. The metaphoric CLUB is a place where people gather and communicate, while the actual work is done somewhere else. It is predicted that more and more companies will begin to work like Hollywood film teams that are formed separately for each project.

The premise of the activity setting approach is that one place – an all-purpose workstation per person -no longer suffices.  Instead, people need multiple workplaces.  These specialized settings span the variety of -often contradictory – office worker requirements.  As tasks change, people move to various specialized activity settings.  This movement is healthy, it makes jobs more interesting and encourages participation in ad hoc temporary groups and greater use of specialized costly equipment.

Robert Kelley, 1985

Because today’s workspace must be a multi-task environment, serving many clients and many different knowledge tasks at once, and because different tasks have different spatial, emotional and tooling requirements, the contemporary environment should be designed to be both flexible and capable of being divided into specialized zones. Within each zone, there may be different sub-areas, each with its own use and feel. In addition, many of these zones can expand and contract, thus, they can be configured to be larger or smaller, to be part of or totally separate from each other as the work demands.

Looking beyond the allocation of space, remember that as a form of communication our environment can be denoted as being multi-sensory; visual, aural, tactile, spatial and so on: “The will of the epoch translated into space”. An effective working environment should inspire workers, showing them that they are needed, and express the distinctive face and values of the enterprise. An office should be a place with an aura of its own. (Contrast this with the kind of anonymous “non-places”, – planes, ships, airports, supermarkets and indeed offices with which we are increasingly surrounded, where the design aim seems to be to eliminate differentiation altogether).

Several principles and design goals drive the basic layout of an environment that communicates effectively: Its image must include a spatial pattern that relates objects within it, relates the environment to the observer, and to other objects in its surrounding community; it must exhibit an architectural grammar and geometry appropriate to its specific mission and fit within the grammar and style of its location; it must control its boundaries in terms of access, light, sound, sight lines, and it must do this without presenting a defensive posture. The environment must include spatial ambiguity – the high variety that creates interest. It must include sheltered places for quiet reflection as well as open spaces for collaboration and expansive thinking. Paths, boundaries, regions, nodes and landmarks add variety, flexibility, build relationships and communication and facilitate feedback and change. To be psychologically comfortable, an environment must be physically comfortable and allow variation in the colour and texture of the furniture, levels and quality of lighting, and acoustical environment.

The evolution of our working environments is an on-going challenge; neither patchwork fixes nor wholesale redesign will suffice in today’s rapidly changing world. As people expand their horizons, so too must the environment expand its ability to serve. Individual elements must be created which can be replaced when outgrown with new elements that still complement the entire system. Frank Lloyd Wright felt the task of the designer was to design for what people can become–to stretch people to reach their potential. Today’s knowledge workers require an environment that challenges them to reach both their own potential and that of their organization whilst also facilitating that progress. The designer must see and communicate through the environment its conscious ability to evolve.

Complex natural systems are our model for successful, creative, evolving work environments. Our daily workspaces must be engineered to be both organic and cybernetic, adjusting to user requirements minutely and without fanfare. Those of you who have worked with us on an Innovation Arts Design Session will recognize these principles ‘in miniature’ in the temporary, mobile environments that we establish for each session. It is for all the reasons described above that we insist on creating the right environment to support the work we do with you. Our dedicated team designs each environment specifically for each client and each challenge, and over the course of the Session it will shift and evolve to guide, mirror, or lead the participants’ journey as they collaborate on the task in hand.

Huddled up with Mindshare, Channel 4 and Jon Snow!

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

Huddle is an amazing event that collects leading media, tech, culture, and business thought-leaders for a day of exhibitions, talks, and discussion. Hosted by Mindshare, the festival allows pioneers from different industries to connect, collaborate and share their output with the public.

We were there to help with that output, providing live graphic recording. We sat in on CHANNEL 4’s “Stories About People” panel, with Jon Snow. Tech was at the forefront of these discussions – the panel debated the role tech plays in helping uncover stories and in their telling. It was interesting to see where traditional techniques in journalism have overlapped with technological invention, and how these overlaps have developed into innovative solutions.

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For more information, check out the Mindshare website:

http://www.mindshareworld.com/uk/about/huddle

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