Home and Away: Maintaining Team Spirit When Your Team is Dispersed


Passing the secondary school near my house at the end of a school day, I am always surprised to encounter on the street a handful of teacher monitors who collar the departing students to check their uniforms are neat and tidy. Are your shoes tied? Is your tie straight and even? Is your jacket in order? If the students are in violation of the uniform code—even on their way home from school—a demerit is given on the spot. Why? Because while in uniform, the kids represent the school, no matter where they are. Should a student wearing the school’s crest cause offence, no matter how small, it is as if the school itself had messed up, and that is bad news.

 

A similar challenge faces businesses who employ workers with non-traditional relationships to the home office such as distance or home working, part- or flexi-time, or the project-by-project contracts so popular in today’s so-called “gig economy.” No matter where your employees are, they represent your brand. So how do you keep your employees involved and engaged when you only see them occasionally? Non-traditional work models are popular because they suit a mobile and flexible workforce, whether maximizing available skills, creating more opportunities, or just a good way to keep people working, consumers spending, and the whole economy moving. The gig economy has existed for a long time in the corporate world where freelance designers or IT professionals, too expensive to keep on staff, are frequently hired temporarily for their unique skills. However, increased connectivity and improved mobile services also mean that even permanent employees don’t need to come into the office every day in order to maintain links to the organization. For the first time in history, employees are in a unique position of being both their own and the company’s person, a state that can be difficult for any manager to cope with: they wear the uniform, but they’re out on the town. So even though a chunk of your employees enjoys a non-traditional career path, what’s the best way to engender values and behaviors across boundaries to ensure distance workers live and breathe your corporate culture?

 

At Innovation Arts, we rely on a talented network of freelancers to support and deliver the work we do. We value their individual expertise, their unique talents, and their ability to bring a distinctive point of view into our design events, which benefits the process of collaboration. We depend upon varied and deep experiences in order to bring the best ideas to life, so by employing contractors to help us out occasionally, we can add the specific skills our business needs to thrive. On any given event, you can be sure to encounter at least one, if not several, freelancers adding a particular spice to the Innovation Arts recipe. Our events are supported by pop-up teams of people who may have never worked together before, but who, from the moment an event kicks off, rely upon and trust one another to get the job done as intensely as in any hospital emergency room. What allows this to happen is a specific pattern language unique to our industry, our philosophy of self-reliance and self-determination, and a simple set of systems and culture that everyone accepts.

 

As someone who used to “gig” for Innovation Arts before I came onto its staff full-time, I can say there are downsides to a free and flexible mode of working. The unstable hours, feast-or-famine workloads, and don’t even get me started on accounting. However, as part of the extended Innovation Arts family, I always knew that if I accepted a freelance project I’d know exactly what I was getting into, specifically what the work would be, and precisely what role I was expected to perform. And that comes down to the values and behaviors Innovation Arts promotes, which are clear and easy to understand, rather than a restrictive management structure. Thanks to our values of “High Performance” and “Honesty,” I always knew my work was valued, I knew I’d be expected to make my own decisions and be honest about the work I was doing and if I needed help, to be collaborative and creative, so I delivered. Because iteration is a key part of our ethos, I knew that if I messed up I would have the chance to try again, to fail better. The unspoken laws of team-working never varied from gig-to-gig, manager-to-manager. And now that I work for IA full time, the same rules apply. By embracing a simple and clear values statement and promoting a desired mode of behavior, Innovation Arts has made working easy for me and other colleagues who have made the switch from freelance, both as full-timers and as contractors.

 

So how do you know if your company’s values are filtering down into a workforce you might only see occasionally—or in the case of app-managed Deliveroo, never—and yet who undeniably represent your organization? How can you engender loyalty and a sense of belonging if you only come in contact now and again? It comes down to the behaviors accepted and promoted for each person who answers to your company’s name. What behaviors do you expect from your employees, whether full-time or contracted, and how do those behaviors reflect your company’s values? We have worked with a number of organizations who have used our game Dilemma® to test how behaviors on the ground map back to the corporate value statement in the company’s lobby, and found that whether you are the CEO or a temp, the action should essentially be the same. By playing through the workplace scenarios in Dilemma®, employees have a chance to explore the preferred responses as well as the actions they might take if pressed for time or to deliver. We’ve discovered that companies who value “respect” will have employees who are respectful, no matter if they are in the home office or on a client site, and that those who embrace “diversity” will employ people who are diverse in ethnicity as well as in attitude. But, if your employees—no matter how entrenched with the company—can’t make sense of your values, or don’t know how the words on the plaque in the lobby translate to day-to-day actions, then you’re in trouble.

 

There can be a distance between the narrative surrounding labor and success, and the lived experience of workers. In our work with a variety of organizations we know that the culture envisioned by the leaders at the top of the tree can sometimes be very different from the culture lived by the employees at the bottom. In our experience, only a small percentage of companies are getting it completely right with respect to values, and that has a knock-on effect to distant parts of the company culture few leaders ever see. The gig economy is certainly working for the employers who want to have special skills on tap, but in order for it to truly work for the entire company, especially those temporary or distance employees who are a long way from head office; there must be something to sweeten the deal. Treating your workers—temporary, part-time, flexi or full—as you would treat the CEO is a small step, but at least it’s a step forward.

Dilemma® is a fast-paced, multiple-choice game that challenges an employee’s knowledge, understanding and interpretation of their organization’s values and behaviors. The mechanics of the game provide a unique opportunity for employees to test, develop and hone their expertise, skills, actions and responses around every day, work-related situations in a safe environment. In comparison to traditional engagement methods, Dilemma® allows values and behaviors to be demonstrated, discussed and debated through play rather than being dictated or imposed. Playing Dilemma® promotes empathy within organizations. Employees begin to understand the challenges their colleagues face every day, building a common sense of pride at the diversity and capabilities that exist within the organization.
 Dilemma® is scalable to the size of organisation; from a large, multinational to an SME. Click here to contact us to discuss how engaging your employees across boundaries could be the secret ingredient to success.
 Innovation Arts is a hybrid strategy consultancy and design agency. Innovation Arts brings a fresh and highly effective approach to stimulating ‘group genius’ through design practices that stretch people’s thinking and initiate ideas. Described by GQ as the ‘management consultant of the future’, the Innovation Arts team is a mixture of strategists, management consultants, designers, advertisers, branding and communications experts and artists, all skilled in helping organizations make change happen. It’s a unique blend that helps an organization think differently about the challenges it’s facing, as well as address them. Based on their experience of working repeatedly with some of the leading FTSE100 and Fortune 100 companies, governments and civil society organizations, their clients engage them because they deliver systemic, high-quality, sustainable outcomes with less risk, more certainty and in a fraction of the time compared to conventional approaches.

 

 

How Employee Engagement could Make or Break your Company in Crisis


From major product recalls to technical systems failures, from Brexit to critical safety issues, the fitness of all organisations to respond is put to the test when crisis management is required.

 

When a situation breaks, the Communications Director is on the frontline managing an increasingly complex number of stakeholders; media, shareholders, suppliers, partners and customers. The objective is to protect the brand and organization while keeping the media coverage to a minimum and stakeholders informed and placated.

 

However, while every Communications Director will ensure their company has a Crisis and Issues plan prepared in advance, one key stakeholder group is too often forgotten: your employees. They can be your saviour in such a situation, available to call upon as well-informed brand ambassadors and corporate advocates, OR they can be your bête noire if ignored. Of course when you are in crisis mode you have to prioritise, but if you wait to engage the broader employee base until the fire-fighting has subsided, it might be too late.

 

We know that most employees need to feel part of a holistic system, to be engaged with the wider purpose of the organisation. So if they are getting their updates from social media, feeling powerless to respond and sensing themselves on the periphery of the organisation, they will not only feel confused and demotivated, but could also present an immediate risk and a longer term weakness. A recent survey showed strongly that if employees no longer believe in their company, or that they can successfully uphold the brand or reputation, they are likely to start looking elsewhere (Gallup Survey 2017) and this effect is amplified in times of crisis.

 

The implications of this are borne out in difficult experience. Whatever the sector or industry, the Communications Directors and Internal Communications Directors we have worked with, who have faced such situations, all say the same – the one thing they would do differently next time is to ensure that all employees accompany the senior team managing the situation in unison.

 

At Innovation Arts, when we talk about Employee Engagement, we are not talking about the measure of employee morale previously known as ‘job satisfaction’. Rather, we are talking about actively engaging the organisation collaboratively in the aspirations, ambitions, trials and successes of the wider company. And we believe that your crisis handling should mirror the way you engage your organisation on a day to day basis, and around important initiatives – just in a more focused and intensive way commensurate with the urgency of the situation.

 

So if you were to come to us looking to put a crisis plan in place that engages your employees effectively, our first question to you would be, what is your internal engagement process OUTSIDE of a crisis situation? Don’t worry if you don’t have one yet, you’re certainly not alone. And it could well be that planning for a crisis situation provides the impetus you need to develop a broader employee engagement mechanism to support your business. We would always recommend putting this plan in place BEFORE you need it! The next question, then, is how to go about designing a plan that will actually be used, and used effectively?

 

Innovation Arts believes that more voices cut down on noise, which is another way of saying that by involving all critical stakeholders in creating the plan they will be expected to deploy, their ownership of the plan not only makes it more effective and reduces resistance but also devolves the leadership required in rapid-response situations.

 

The number of critical stakeholders we suggest you involve in creating your plan can vary between 12 and 100 depending the size and complexity of your organisation, and this in turn will guide the time investment required to collaborate and align on your Internal Engagement plan. Depending on your needs we will recommend between one and three days of intensive work in a DesignSession for exponential results.

 

Typical questions you might want to answer in such a DesignSession include:

 

By using Design Thinking and Collaborative methodologies in this process, the outcome will be more robust. From Framing of how a crisis situation might occur in your organisation to Architecting around different plausible scenarios and Building an employee engagement plan which is aligned across stakeholder groups.

 

All our DesignSessions are bespoke, co-designed with you and every one starts with a simple conversation about the opportunity to collaborate. Click here to contact us to discuss how engaging your employees could be the secret ingredient to success.

 

Innovation Arts is a hybrid strategy consultancy and design agency. Innovation Arts brings a fresh and highly effective approach to stimulating ‘group genius’ through design practices that stretch people’s thinking and initiate ideas. 
Described by GQ as the ‘management consultant of the future’, the Innovation Arts team is a mixture of strategists, management consultants, designers, advertisers, branding and communications experts and artists, all skilled in helping organisations make change happen. It’s a unique blend that helps an organisation think differently about the challenges it’s facing, as well as address them.
Based on their experience of working repeatedly with some of the leading FTSE100 and Fortune 100 companies, governments and civil society organisations, their clients engage them because they deliver systemic, high-quality, sustainable outcomes with less risk, more certainty and in a fraction of the time compared to conventional approaches.

Values: A Double-Edged Sword


What happens when they go uber-wrong?

When new employees join Uber, they are asked to subscribe to 14 core company values, which include making bold bets, being “obsessed’ with the customer, and “always be hustlin’.” The company particularly emphasizes meritocracy, the idea that the best and brightest will rise to the top based on their efforts, even if it means stepping on colleagues to get there. The top priority: achieve growth and revenue targets. Those values have helped propel Uber to one of Silicon Valley’s biggest success stories. Yet, the focus on pushing for the best result has also fueled its “toxic culture” and present troubles: crippled by complaints that it condones sexual harassment, bullying and retaliation against those who complain, shedding executives and board members like so much unwanted freight, a cutthroat, win-at-any-costs culture where workers gain advantage by tearing each other down. And on Tuesday, its CEO, Travis Kalanick, has announced plans to take a leave of absence to get his act together. Poor embattled Uber.

 

After months of research into the inner workings of the company, US Attorney general Eric Holder this week published a report with recommendations for what Uber could do to redeem itself https://goo.gl/zwGhJA. Central to the report was a recommendation to “Reformulate Uber’s 14 Cultural Values,” to reflect more inclusive and positive behaviors.

 

Corporate value statements—those things you often see engraved in Plexiglas in corporate lobbies—exist to remind a company of its purpose in the wider world, of its very human reason to exist. But they must move beyond the lobby to act as the glue to bind employees together like a family, a beacon to steer towards when the going gets rough, and a code of ethics to hold employees to a higher standard. And yet, because company value statements are—necessarily—broad and open (or in Uber’s case vague and meaningless), a company’s values can be difficult for employees to translate into day-to-day behavior. What, exactly is meant by “super-pumpedness,” and does that mean downing several cans of Red Bull before clocking on, or something else entirely? And what happens when colleagues have different interpretations of the values? How easy is it for the language of a company’s values to translate into action for the boots-on-the-ground employee? How can a company ensure that its values are lived, not just talked about?

 

Innovation Arts knows that company culture crises are often an accumulation of small transgressions by employees who do not understand what the corporate values mean for the day-to-day. Or that trouble begins when the values fail to communicate what top brass believes their company to be. In our experience, a company’s values come to life within the company culture, which tends to bubble up from the bottom, from the lowliest employee to the CEO. If a company’s stated values include respect and diversity, then employees will be respectful of one another, form teams with people not like themselves, and reach outside their own sphere for new ideas. When your company values and culture promote “be yourself” and “toe-stepping,” then, well, just ask Uber what happens.

 

We have worked with a number of companies and cherished national institutions who are mindful of the impact values have on an organization, and wanted to ensure their values were meaningful for the people who follow them every day. However, admitting that you don’t quite understand them, or maybe that you interpret your corporate values differently than your colleagues can be a difficult conversation. That’s where the concept of game science can literally be a game-changer. By working with game designers, Innovation Arts has developed a new way to engage and inspire employees about their organization through our game Dilemma™ that translates an organisation’s values into day-to-day behaviours for every employee to understand and act upon. Dilemma™ employs a rigorous interview process to ensure a bespoke experience for each organization that uses it, and allows employees to put their corporate values through their paces through a series of scenarios matched with potential responses. Players earn points for responding with the action most closely tied to the intent of their company’s values—carefully avoiding the reactions born of habit or context. As much as we want to aspire to the better angels of our nature, it is a fact of modern life that we go astray, especially when time is short. Dilemma™ addresses these little slips and shortcuts, and encourages the players to talk through what a “wrong” response is, and yet, why an employee might be tempted to take the easy route. By identifying the preferred actions and the likely workarounds, what we have noticed is that the people who play Dilemma™ are more likely to talk about their company’s values in a way that is meaningful for each person, clarifying what the values are, why they exist, and how they should be enacted. Being honest enough to have an open and frank conversation about the accepted wisdom of company culture can motivate a group to own their values, and bring them to life.

 

Corporate values everywhere are a hot topic. The May 2017 issue of Fast Company magazine featured a cover story about the importance of embracing corporate values, and the impact they can have on the wider world. From automakers such as Ford and Audi to fashion houses like Gucci and Ralph Lauren, from health care firms to consumer packaged goods makers, companies are increasingly seeking to align their commercial activities with larger social and cultural values—not just because it makes them look good, but because employees and customers have started to insist on it. Millennials spend money in areas they believe in, and companies will simply have to respond. If you count the number of lives big companies like Facebook or Airbnb touch, they can have as much influence as a national official, so what they stand for themselves matters.

 

And that finally is what makes a company’s values so important. With global politics in a state of upheaval and trust in governments and other institutions suffering, corporations and large businesses may have to step forward to fill that gap and lead. What will ultimately differentiate those leaders is their inner motivations, their intentions. If your company intends to do good, and your employees know how to translate that into action, then it is clear on which side you will end up. What are your intentions? Are your employees living it every day, with every action, every decision? Perhaps it’s not clear whether they are engaged or not, or if your company’s values are simply words without meaning. If so, we encourage you to challenge your people to live up to what you say you stand for, to make each other better. What do you do when the chips are down, or you are in a hurry, or you are simply desperate to make that sale? We know that if you can count on your values in times of stress, then you will be able to rely upon them in times of ease. And it is possible that having a higher purpose will help a company’s profits in the long run.

 

Corporate values, like personal ones, exist to make everyone’s life better. If you enact them in small ways every day, the value compounds, and you can make a big impact.

 

Is your organisation one of the 10% that is getting it spot on with Engagement and Values, or are you looking for new ideas and support? Whether it’s about articulating the right values for your organisation, embedding them, or engaging your employees around strategic initiatives, we’d love you to get in touch to explore how design thinking, collaboration and games science such as Dilemma™ could help.

 

Innovation Arts is a globally-recognised hybrid strategy consultancy and design agency described by GQ as ‘the management consultant of the future’. Our focus is on creating the optimal conditions for diverse groups to solve, together, any complex organisational challenge. When faced with challenging disruptions, from a major new product launch to navigating a merger, the level of complexity demands more than the existing processes can handle. By implementing a design thinking-based approach, we deliver high-quality, sustainable outcomes with less risk, more certainty and in a fraction of the time compared to conventional agency approaches.

HR – Nurturing Talent in a Climate of Change


Recruitment and retention issues across a number of sectors are costing businesses millions. For HR Directors, this is a priority, but it is also a complex issue and a challenge to solve.

Whether our clients are FTSE 100 Directors, Global Directors of multinationals or large public institutions, one thing HR Directors express is the need to support both change initiatives and day-to-day operations whilst under greater pressure and flux than before. To paraphrase the Red Queen, We must now run as fast as we can, just to stay in place. And if you wish to go anywhere you must run twice as fast as that.

With voluntary resignations at an all-time high and unemployment rates historically low, the pressure is on HR Directors to find innovative approaches.

Whilst some of the evolution in employee mobility can be put down to external shifts in culture, demographics and economics there are other factors that fall within a businesses sphere of influence. Innovation Arts suggests two areas of focus that HR Directors can lead within their organisations for proven and measureable results:

1) Employee Engagement as a verb not just a KPI.

 

Measuring absenteeism, turnover, and productivity might give you a metric of how engaged your employees feel, but true employee engagement is more than a KPI, it’s a way of life. HR Directors can lead this, but the whole leadership team needs to get behind it. It’s about getting the whole organisation involved, and actively behind the Company’s purpose and strategic objectives.

It can seem easier and faster, particularly in a large company, to take high-level decisions in the boardroom, and cascade strategies top-down rather than face the mammoth task of truly engaging hundreds and thousands of employees, and in the short term maybe it is. But there’s always a price to pay down the line when it comes to delivering the strategies.

Teams that are consistently high performing all show a number of common factors, including collaboration, trust and transparency. Conflicts are sought out and resolved together, not ignored or over-ruled. The companies we work with that invest in up-front collaboration on big decisions see pay back many times over in true employee engagement and measurable business results.

2) Values and Behaviours that support your strategy, are understood in practice and are

measureable across the organisation.

 

As well as playing a vital role in delivering an organisation’s strategy and objectives, lived values and behaviours are also instrumental to managing talent throughout the employee lifecycle. Most companies have them on a poster on the wall somewhere, yet it’s a rare company where they are actively managed. In our experience, sectors such as Health and Hospitality – where you might naturally expect strong common values to guide employee actions – show the strongest sense of shared values amongst employees, yet without company-wide interventions these values are still not translated into daily lived behaviours. Indeed, employees express a sense of frustration with that disconnect. In other sectors such as Finance or Manufacturing, the Company Purpose doesn’t always align naturally with any specific values, and if they are not integral to the recruitment process then it is only by chance that employees find anything to relate to in the values found on the corporate charter. Overall Innovation Arts estimates that fewer than one in ten organisations have values and behaviours that are clearly understood and lived on a day-to-day basis.

Can your employees articulate your organisation’s values and explain how they affect the decisions they take and the way they behave in their own jobs? When an employee identifies strongly with an organisation’s values they are much more likely to engage and to stay. The implication for HR Directors is that from recruitment through day-to-day work to performance management, values and behaviours should be an integral part of what we measure and track.

At Innovation Arts we believe playful approaches get serious results, and this is why our Games Science team has developed a suite of easy to use, effective and engaging tools including DilemmaSelect for recruitment, and Dilemma for embedding and tracking desired values and behaviours sustainably.

Where do you fit? Is your organisation one of the 10% that is getting it spot on with Engagement and Values, or are you looking for new ideas and support? Whether it’s about articulating the right values for your organisation, embedding them, or engaging your employees around strategic initiatives, we’d love you to get in touch to explore how design thinking, collaboration and games science could help.

Innovation Arts is a globally-recognised hybrid strategy consultancy and design agency described by GQ as ‘the management consultant of the future’. Our focus is on creating the optimal conditions for diverse groups to solve, together, any complex organisational challenge. When faced with challenging disruptions, from a major new product launch to navigating a merger, the level of complexity demands more than the existing processes can handle. By implementing a design thinking-based approach, we deliver high-quality, sustainable outcomes with less risk, more certainty and in a fraction of the time compared to conventional agency approaches.
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